Emotionless World-Jiyoon& Elias

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Once upon a time in a land closer to us than you might believe, a hero was about to be born. Her name was Hero, though there was nothing exceptional about her – yet. On a winter morning, something about her had changed. She was looking outside the window and wishing she could be somewhere else, in a magical world far far away. Little did she know that her wish was about to come true.
She closed her eyes and imagined a world completely different from the place she felt stuck in. As she opened her eyes, she was no longer in her room. (1. ABSENTATION) She felt a warm breeze caressing her face. Everywhere she looked she saw sand. On the ground there were footprints leading over a dune. She decided to follow them.
As she walked up the dyne, a skyline of buildings drew across the sky. She was mesmerised by the beauty of the fairytale world.
In the city people seemed to be in a hurry. For a fairytale world, Hero thought the place seemed to lack any sense of happiness – or any emotion.
  • Hero’s appearance differs from the people in the fairytale world, so the guard take her to the dictator
  • The dictator tells the hero to go back where she came from. She tries to imagine her room, but she is unable to travel back. She is stuck in the fairytale world. The dictator tells Hero to not go to the mountain. (on top of the mountain there is a magical object that steals the people’s emotions) (2.INTERDICTION)
  • Struggle to get to the mountain
  • On top of the mountain there is a big battle in which she destroys the object. When she destroys the object a rift opens between the abyss and the fairytale world. She pushes the dictator in it just before the rift closes.
  • She goes back to the city that has changed. The people reward her for her courage and asjfbalijsfhnakf. The people make her the necklace.
  • She travels back home.
  • Her to complete whatever her task is, she is able to travel back with a necklace that the fairytale people made her, with what she is able to travel back and forth between the fairytale world and the normal world. (reward)

 

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In what ways might Propp’s structural analysis be helpful when analyzing stories?

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A fairytale is a story involving fantastic forces and beings and distinct genre within the larger category of folktale. To explore the fairytale, there has a Folklorist who broke up fairy tales into sections. His name is Vladimir Propp (1895-1970). He was a Soviet folklorist and scholar who analyzed the basic plot components of Russian folk tales to identify their simplest irreducible narrative elements.

He publishes ‘Morphology of the Folktale’ in 1928. The word ‘morphology’ means the study of forms. In botany, the term ‘morphology’ means the study of the component parts of a plant, of their relationship to each other and to the whole – in other words, the study of a plant’s structure. The theory supports about characters and actions as having narrative functions. Every character has one of these functions which is understood as acts of character, defined from the point of view their significance for the course of the action. and they provide a structure for the text. Also this approach can be useful when analyzing narrative. In addition, analysis of folktales can be made ‘according to the functions of its character’

There have Prop’s Narrative Functions : Type of character and Function

  • The Hero : Generally leads the narrative

– looking for something

– who has a quest

– trying to solve something what they want to succeed

  • The Villain : Struggles against Hero

-Seen as morally bad

-Stops hero from achieving goal

-Audience turns against them

  • The Donor : Gives hero agent(such as magical weapon or wisdom)

– Enable hero to complete quest

  • The Helper : Supports hero

– appears at critical moments in the narrative

– they define hero with their limitations

  • The Princess : May take two forms

– objects which os sought by the hero (finding where the villain has taken them)

– the reward

  • The  father : gives the hero his reward for completing the quest
  • The Dispather : character who makes the lack known and sends the hero off

When an audience reads a media text it deploys its knowledge of these character types in order to decode the meaning of the text.

A tale usually begin with some sort of initial situation. The members of a family are enumerated, or the future hero is simply introduced by mention of his name or indication of his status. Although this situation is not  a function, it nevertheless is an important morphological element. The species of tale beginnings can be examined only at the end of the present work. After the initial situation there follow functions:

  1. ONE OF THE MEMBERS OF A FAMILY ABSENTS HIMSELF FROM HOME.
  2. AN INTRERDIGTION IS ADDRESSED TO THE HERO.
  3. THE INTERDICTION IS VIOLATED.
  4. THE VILLAIN MAKE AN ATTEMPT AT RECONNAISSANCE.
  5. THE VILLAIN RECEIVES INFORMATION ABOUT HIS VICTIM.
  6. THE VILLAIN ATTEMPTS TO DECEIVE HIS VICTIM IN ORDER TO TAKE POSSESSION OF HIS BELONGINGS.
  7. THE VICTIM SUBMITS TO DECEPTION AND THEREBY UNWITTINGLY HELPS HIS ENEMY.
  8. THE VILLAIN CAUSES HARM OR INJURY TO  A MEMBER OF A FAMILY. ONE MEMBER OF A FAMILY EITHER LACKS SOMETHING OR DESIRES TO HAVE SOMETHING.
  9. MISFORTUNE OR LACK IS MADE KNOWN; THE HERO IS APPROACHED WITH A REQUEST OR COMMAND; HE IS ALLOWED TO GO OR HE IS DISPATCHED.
  10. THE SEEKER AGREES TO OR DECIDES UPON COUNTERACTION.
  11. THE HERO LEAVES HOME.
  12. THE HERO IS TESTED, INTERROGATED, ATTACKED, ETC.,WHICH PREPARED THE WAY FOR HIS RECEIVING EITHER A MAGICAL AGENT OR HELPER.
  13. THE HERO REACTS TO THE ACTIONS OF THE FUTURE DONOR.
  14. THE HERO ACQUIRES THE USE OF A MAGICAL AGENT.
  15. THE HERO IS TRANSFERRED, DELIVERED, OR LED TO THE WHEREABOUTS OF AN OBJECT OF SEARCH.
  16. THE HERO AND THE VILLAIN JOIN IN DIRECT COMBAT.
  17. THE HERO IS BRANDED.
  18. THE VILLAIN IS DEFEATED.
  19. THE INITIAL MISFORTUNE OR LACK IS LIQUIDATED.
  20. THE HERO RETURNS.
  21. THE HERO IS PURSUED.
  22. RESCUE OF THE HERO FORM PURSUIT.
  23. THEH HERO, UNRECOGNIZED, ARRIVES HOME OR IN ANOTHER COUNTRY.
  24. A FALSE HERO PRESENTS UNFOUNDED CLAIMS.
  25. A DIFFICULT TASK IS PROPOSED TO THE HERO.
  26. THE TASK IS RESOLVED.
  27. THE HERO IS RECOGNIZED.
  28. THE FALSE HERO OR VILLAIN IS EXPOSED.
  29. THE HERO IS GIVEN A NEW APPEARANCE.
  30. THE VILLAIN IS PUNISHED.
  31. THE HERO IS MARRIED AND ASCENDS THE THRONE.

At this point the tale draws to a close. It should also be stated that there are several actions of tale hero in individual cases which do not conform to , nor are defined by, any of the functions already mentioned.They are either forms which cannot be understood without comparative material, or they are forms transferred from tales of other classes. According to his function, fairytale can be analyzed.


Reference list:

units.miamoioh.edu, (2016) Available at : http://www.units.miamioh.edu/technologyandhumanities/propp.htm (Accessed 08 Feb. 2016)
Propp, V. (1968). Morphology of the folktale. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Warner, M. (2014) ’Once Upon a Time’ A short history of the fairytale. Oxford: OUP

Image source:

Wikipedia (2016) vladimir Propp (image) Available at : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Propp (Accessed 08 Feb. 2016)

How do cinematic codes contribute meaning in a scene of your choice?

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PAPERMAN-DIRECTED BY JOHN KAHRS(2012)

“Every morning on my way to work I would go through Grand Central Station and sometimes you’d meet eye to eye with people, just strangers, like a pretty girl or something, and you’d think is there a connection? You feel that connection for a split second and wonder who that person was. That’s the core idea of it – what if two people were really perfect for each other, and they had that chance meeting? And what if they were separated – how would those two people get back together again? And how could a little bit of magic and fate intervene to bring them back together?”

The short follows the story of a lonely young man in New York City, whose destiny takes an unexpected turn after a chance meeting with a beautiful woman on his morning commute. Convinced the girl of his dreams is gone forever, he gets a second chance when he spots her in a skyscraper window across the avenue from his office, and sets out to get her attention.

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This short film has noticeable features. Firstly, the Black and White are main colour except the red kiss mark on the piece of paper. when the man and woman meet together bright lighting which is based  on natural light of the sunshine. It can be call ‘High Key’. In contrast, there has several shade, small amount of light scene when they are apart or inside the building. That scenes show dull and dreary tone-‘Low Key’ lighting that has deep shadows. Secondly, sound. There is no dialogue in the short film what their voices may like or their names are. Instead of dialogue, the character’s action tell the story to  audience. This kind of actions work more than dialogue to understand.

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The last one is camera technique. In the film, a neutral view is only used at the beginning and ending scene. Except these scenes, there are many different angles shown to represent character’s hard journey for reach to her. The very long shot shows the distance between him and her. Also in between this distance the paper plane play important role to connect man and woman. That is the material to catch her attention  and also connecting link. Representing this plane effectively, the camera is following from Worm’s eye view to Bird’s Eye view. End by reuniting the camera angle is back in neutral view. This film has simple story, colour and no dialogue. However this kinds of elements are giving great story telling by contributing as a cinematic codes.


 

 

Reference list :

Fxguide (2013) The inside story behind Disney’s Paperman Available at: https://www.fxguide.com/featured/the-inside-story-behind-disneys-paperman/ (Accessed: 04 February 2016).

Jessica Mallinson A2 Media Blog, (2013) Textual Analysis: Paperman. Available at: https://jessicamallinsona2.wordpress.com/2013/07/12/textual-analysis-paperman/ (Accessed: 04 February 2016)

 

HOW DO CHARACTERS ENGAGE WITH AUDIENCE?

KEYWORDS : EMOTION, REPRESENTATION, CHARACTERS CONSTRUCTION, ARCHETYPE, STEREOTYPE.

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How do characters engage with audience?

Epic Theatre

  • Bertolt Brecht (1898-1956) entered the German theatre as one of a number of young playwright at a time when stage production was in a whirl of experience: realism was crumbling and new approaches were being put to the test.
  • He wanted his audiences to adopt a critical perspective in order to recognize social injustice and exploitation and to be moved to go forth from the theatre and effect change in the world outside.

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History of Epic Theatre came from Bertolt Bercht. His earliest work was influenced by German Expressionism, but it was his preoccupation with Marxism and the idea that man and society could be intellectually analyzed that led him to develop his theory of “Epic Theatre.” he believed that theatre should appeal not to the spectator’s feelings but to his reason. While still providing entertainment, it should be strongly didactic and capable of provoking social change. In the Realistic theatre of illusion, he argued, the spectator tended to identify with the characters on stage and become emotionally involved with them rather than being stirred to think about his own life. To encourage the audience to adopt a more critical attitude to what was happening on stage, Brecht developed his Verfremdungs-effekt (“alienation effect”)–i.e., the use of anti-illusive techniques to remind the spectators that they are in a theatre watching an enactment of reality instead of reality itself. Such techniques included flooding the stage with harsh white light, regardless of where the action was taking place, and leaving the stage lamps in full view of the audience; making use of minimal props and “indicative” scenery; intentionally interrupting the action at key junctures with songs in order to drive home an important point or message; and projecting explanatory captions onto a screen or employing placards. From his actors Brecht demanded not realism and identification with the role but an objective style of playing, to become in a sense detached observers.

As the theory developed, Brecht argued that all theatre artists, from the writer to the lighting engineer, should work together to induce the distancing defect and make the performance truly objective. This idea, however, had nothing to do with the old Wagnerian unity of the arts. In epic theatre each artist was to make a separate contribution.

 

  • The actor as we have seen, would ‘show’ rather than imitate, and Brecht advocated number of rehearsal devices to encourage this : the actor would speak in the third person, or in the past tense, or even speak the stage directions Gesture would consciously indicate his inner feeling, as of the actor were visibly observing his own movements.
  • The designer of the set, following Piscator, would dispense with illusion and symbolism, and build according to the actor’s needs. There would be no suggestion of a ‘forth wall’, and, except for props, the stage would be bare, merely an open space on which to tell a tory.
  • The playwright  would structure his play episodically, preceding each scene with a written title, which would remain in position until replaced by another one, and offer an ‘historical’ account of the action of the scene.
  • The director would arrange the blocking or grouping of the actors on the stage, not merely to achieve some formal beauty of good composition, but essentially to clarify the structure of human relationship in the play.
  • The lighting designer would abandon the idea of hiding the sources of light to achieve a mysterious effect that would draw the audience into the action. The stage itself would be lit with a plain white light so that the actor would seem to be in the same world as the audience.
  • The composer of the music should express his idea of the play’s theme independently, and so provide a separate comment on the action, which might often be in conflict with the activity of the characters.

Reference List

Bbc.co.uk, (2016). BBC Bitesize – GCSE Drama – Epic theatre and Brecht – Revision 2. [online] Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/guides/zwmvd2p/revision/2[Accessed 27 Jan. 2016].

National Theatre,(2016). An Introduction to Brechtian Theatre. Available at :  http://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/video/an-introduction-to-brechtian-theatre (Accessed 28 Jan 2016)

Oregon State University,(2015). Bertolt Brecht and THE EPIC THEATRE (1). Available at : http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/ger343/brechtet.htm (Accessed 28 Jan 2016)

Styan, J. (1981). Modern drama in theory and practice 3. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

The Drama Teacher,(2016). Epic Theatre Conventions. Available at : http://www.thedramateacher.com/epic-theatre-conventions/(Accessed 27 Jan 2016)

Review: ‘Spatial Illumination- 9 Light in 9 Rooms’

Great exhibition at D MUSEUM in South Korea. This exhibition presents ‘Spatial Illumiantion – 9 Lights in 9 Rooms,’ an inaugual exhibition introducing ‘Light Art’ by leading international artist. The exhibition is comprised of nine seperate rooms containing artworks encompassing a variety of genres, including installation, video, sculpture, sound and design. Arranged in the form of a progession from observation of pure light to direct experience of spaces designed to stimulate the sense, the nine work here all take light as their material, using it in a variety of forms and expressions and in combination with other sensory elements such as colour, sound and movement. Light is thus expanded into a medium of diverse properties. Due to the contrast of lights and sound the people’s concentration is maximized.

  • Room 01-‘meet a pureness of light’.

Cerith Wyn Evans’s work He presents a light as the trace of bodies movement. Through the complex line of white light attract attention to pureness of light.

  • Room 02- ‘find a color of light’.

Flynn Talbot’s work. In 2010 Flynn Talbot Studio was established and he was awarded “Young Lighting Designer of the Year.” Red, blue and green lights moving across a faceted triangular structure created multicoloured shadows in this installation by Australian lighting specialist Flynn Talbot. His work explores the way in which light impacts human experience and transforms space. He consistently aims to create unique and intimate light pieces that enable viewers a chance to feel transported while experiencing a sense of connectedness.

  • Room 03- ‘Build a space of light’

Erwin Redl’s work which called ‘Line Fade’.

In this installation, red and blue rays of light generated by fiber optic bundles form a cylindrical space. Due to the very nature its architectural dimension, participating by simply being ‘present’ is an integral part of the installations. And the formal aspect of this work becomes easily accessible through conscious aesthetic reduction to a minimalist vocabulary.

  • Room 04- ‘Face to specter of light’

Carlos Cruz-Diez’s work which called Chromosaturation. These works relate to the idea that in the origin of every culture lies a primary event as a starting point. A simple situation that generates a whole system of thoughts, sensitivity, myths, etc.

The Chromosaturation is an artificial environment composed of three color chambers, one red, one green and one blue that immerse the visitor in a completely monochrome situation. This experience creates disturbances in the retina, accustomed to receive wide range of colors simultaneously. The Chromosaturation can act as a trigger, activating in the viewer the notion of color as a material or physical situation, going into space without the aid of any form or even without any support, regardless of cultural beliefs.

  • Room 05- ‘Sprinkle piece of light’

Studio Roso’s installation which called Mirror Branch Daelim (2015).

‘Mirror branch’ is part of Studio Roso’s mirror disc series, based on the conceptual outset that ‘Light is only seen when reflected.’ This installation with thousands of mirror discs suspended from a branch-like structure reflects light and creates shadows, blending boundaries between space and the artwork and creating new narratives. Inspired by beautiful experience of walking in a forest with light filtering through the leaves, this work adds an emotional layer to the combination of nature and man-made elements

  • Room 06- ‘immersion of rhythm of light’

This work was first installed on the Brusov Ship, a renovated vessel moored on the Moscow River. The ceiling of the ship’s central hall is covered by 1,400 hexagonal tiles; the artists used four ultra short throw projectors to beam light of various colours and patterns and create an audio-visual effect that brought the sounds of the whale to life. Tundra’s light patterns and sounds give viewers an experience akin to swimming serenely in the sea with whales, listening to their singing.

  • Room 07- ‘Feel of wind of light’

Paul Cocksedge’s work which is Bourrasque (2015).

By reawakening us to the meaning and quality of light, it demonstrates the possibilities of expanding from light that we ‘see,’ visually and aesthetically, to light that we ‘experience’ physically. With its nine distinct spectra created by light, and its experimental placing of viewers in control of new, spatial light, ‘Spatial Illumination – 9 Lights in 9 Rooms’ offers to open new horizons in light art.

Room 08-Paint shadows of light

Dennis Parren

DON’T LOOK INTO THE LIGHT

This installation work challenges the audience to interact with the light to create shapes and compositions of coloured shadows by entering the CMYK-lit area. Previously displayed at Glow Light Festival 2013 in Eindhoven, it proved a hit among visitors.

Room 09-Lose yourself in the time of light 

Olivier Ratsi

ONION SKIN

By red and white lines and geometric forms that repeatedly appear, overlap and fragment, this immersive installation work creates multi-layered visual combinations like the skins of an onion. Light projection onto a module of two walls intersecting at right angles uses two-dimensional graphics to constantly create three-dimensional spaces with volume and depth, transforming the flat into a new dimension that cannot be reached. Thomas Vaquie, the fellow Antivj artist, composed the accompanying sound, which plays an important role in ‘peeling’ away the material ‘skins’ of the space.

Review : Jimmie Durham-Various Items and Complaints

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‘Sweet, Light, Crude’, 2008

The great artwork showed at Serpentine Gallery. That is Jimmie Durham’s exhibition, which called Various Items and complaints (1 October- 8 November). Exhibition was consisting of installation arts and drawings. All of his works were really interesting and impressive. Jimmie Durham (born 1940,USA) was born in the USA in 1940, and has been creating artworks across media for the past five decades. He is also a poet, essayist and political activist, and took a central role in the American Indian Movement in the 1970s. Various Items and Complaints is Durham’s first show in a UK institution since 1992 and through the works on display, it is clear that whilst Durham has retired from political campaigning, he continues to practice political activism through his artworks. Durham’s approach is similarly oblique. Sweet, Light, Crude, 2008  consists of oil barrels painted saccharine colours and stenciled with words such as “Honest”, “Brave”, “Fine and “True” which encapsulate the virtues that fine upstanding citizens aspire to. The paradox, of course, is that a society dependent on exploiting oil and other natural resources must rely on less desirable qualities, such as cunning, deception and ruthlessness, to flourish by outwitting the competition.

At the heart of Durham’s practice is a continuous exploration and production of hybrid and seemingly fragmented installations that invite the viewer to reconstitute or reconstruct the underlying signs embedded in his works. His work addresses the political and cultural forces, e.g. the forces of colonialism that constructs our contemporary discourses and challenges our understanding of authenticity in art. Durham has always had an anarchical and political undertone to his work. With stellar shows around the world at the Venice Biennial, Whitney Biennial and Document, Durham has made a name with his playful agility and wry irony with words and materials. Crucially Durham is interested in the deeper meaning behind materials and how man made objects interact with culture.

Durham said ‘ My work might be considered ‘interventionist’ because it works against the two foundations of the European tradition: Belief and Architecture. My work is against the connection of art to architecture, to the ‘statue’, to monumentality. I want it to be investigative, and therefore not ‘impressive’, not believable.’ Through this exhibition the most impressive thing was the artist. Even he is an artist he doesn’t work only an art field. I think, that point is also important to me. Because of the way of think if I have knowledge of other field, it will work into great way for make my art piece. The reason why I thought like that was an idea that will not static, but only an art field. It can lead to my work various way. To sum up, Jimmie Durham’s exhibition was great time to extend way of idea developing.

Review : Southern light stations

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Southern light station is a new body of work by noemie Goudal(b.1984, France). It is on the photographer’s gallery. When I visit this gallery, there was quiet atmosphere and in the middle has a round hall which also has several pieces of her work. Almost of works were about sky. One of her work which is named ‘Station V’ and that was the most impressive work. It is a picture by using smoke and flashlight. Due to the contrast of the colour for example black and white it makes me be more concentrated. Also that artwork was really quiet and calm, but also on the other hand, has something intensive feeling.  According to Noémie Goudal, picture was taken at night and she wants to make them to be alive.

This exhibition is consists of entirely new and previously unseen works. it makes Noémie Goudal’s interest in manmade interventions into the natural world, through photographs which portray complex and ambiguous constructions created by the artist within the landscape.To start making her work, she was reading a lot of theories of how the sky was perceived.  It builds on her practice of creating ambiguous geometric constructions placed within a landscape and explores the artist’s enduring interest in our historical, scientific and symbolic relationship with the skies.

Through photographs, stereoscopes and architectural installations, the exhibition aims to explore the intangible nature of celestial space – long considered a mirror of terrestrial turmoil as well as an expression of the sacred. By using other object which or like a magnifier glass or paper, the sky can be more stand out than when it is present just itself. To sum up, this exhibition’s mood was generally calm. However in the clam mood, the pictures were intense. This mood was reached to audience who see this art pieces. And it was great experience to explore about the sky in the other way.